Bonnie Wilson Funeral Program

Bonnie Wilson Obituary

Bonnie Harriet Wilson (Skjelver), the daughter of Otto and Elsie Skjelver (Lambrecht) was born May 31, 1921, on her parents’ farm north of Inavale, Nebraska in Webster County. She departed this life October 3, 2018, at the Colonial Villa Nursing Home in Alma Nebraska, at the age of 97 years, 4 months, and 2 days.

As a young girl, she attended the New Virginia county school, and then graduated from Red Cloud High School in 1940. While attending school Bonnie and her sisters lived in an apartment in Red Cloud during the week and would spend the weekends back on the family farm. She continued her education to receive her teaching certificate and taught for several years at North Star and Harmony County Schools. She told stories of building fires to keep warm and also hauling water into the schools.

On October 3, 1942, she was united in marriage with Johnny Robert Wilson in Smith Center, Kansas. To this union, they were blessed with three children, Teresa Ann, Robert Leroy, and Jayne Jo.

Bonnie was a very active farm wife and enjoyed helping out on the family farm and ranch. She would prepare and serve meals to all the farmhands and family always with a freshly baked dessert. On Wednesday afternoon you could find her working on a quilt with the ladies in the church basement. And in the evenings Johnny and Bonnie enjoyed playing cards with their many neighbors and friends.

Bonnie was active in the UMW Church group, Ladies Aid and the Ladies Extension Club. She was also a 4H leader for many years and helped with many 4H projects for her kids and grandkids.

She was preceded in death by her husband Johnny; a daughter Teresa Wilson; her parents; and a sister Eloise Sanford.

Left to cherish her memory are her son Robert Wilson and his wife Diana, her daughter Jayne Hogeland and her husband William; 5 grandchildren, Laci Dinkler and husband Scott, Amber Gibson and husband Wade, Geoffrey Hogeland and wife Kelli, Grant Hogeland and wife Tiffany, and Gillian Hogeland; 11 great-grandchildren, Makayla, Morgan, Jacob and Janaya Dinkler, Lee and John Gibson, Ian, Iaasc, Emerson, and Elliett Hogeland, and Everly Hogeland; sisters Doris Padovan and Ila Young, and a host of nieces, nephews, family members and friends.

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 am, Monday, October 8th, 2018 at the United Methodist Church in Bladen. Interment will be in the New Virginia Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the New Virginia Cemetery.

Wilson Farm 1953 Aerial Photo

1953_wilson_farm_aerial_photo

Jens Krichau Naturalization Papers

Jens Krichau Immigration ID Card

Directory of Webster County Nebraska 1894 – Otto

Download (PDF, 249KB)

Source:
Directory of Webster County Nebraska, 1894
Otto – Pages 66-67

Weddings Around the World

Under a wide prairie sky, Sherry and Eddie Harlow, high-school sweethearts, pass through a hail of rice and good wishes leaving New Virginia Church, near Red Cloud, which her pioneer grandparents helped build.

Under a wide prairie sky, Sherry and Eddie Harlow, high-school sweethearts, pass through a hail of rice and good wishes leaving New Virginia Church, near Red Cloud, which her pioneer grandparents helped build.

A World Full of Weddings

June, aside from rhyming gaily and conveniently with croon, spoon, love’s tune and honeymoon, has other useful and important hymeneal attributes: in much of the world spring planting is about done, marriageable boys and girls graduate from institutions of learning and the weather is getting just fine-“rare,” the poets called it. For these and a lot of other emotional and anthropological reasons June, bridewise, is very big. The world’s young folks, who get married to the tune (love’s) of many millions a year, like the month and in America about 400,00 of 1961’s estimated three million of them have taken, or will take, the plunge at this bright and happy time.

Last week Life sent photographers to sample 13 wedding on four continents. In Spain, Nebraska and York, England (p. 43) members of old local families were joined in matrimony in a solemn Christian ritual that has varied little over the centuries. But it is still a grave and joyous ceremony whether it takes place to the strains of Lohengrin, or the drums of a tribal dance or the tintinnabulation of a set of Chinese cymbals tapped by a troupe of hired merrymakers.

Source:
Life Magazine
June 16, 1961
Pages 36-37

Note:
The picture spanned two pages in the magazine layout, which is why there is a gap between the left and right sides.

New Virginia Cemetery

To organize a community cemetery, the families in the area met at the New Virginia school house on the 23rd of April 1887. The Otto Cemetery Association was organized, with Richard T. Payne elected as president. It was located in the northwest corner of section 34 and was called “Otto” cemetery, after the first name of Otto Skjelver. Following the land dispute the cemetery was called the “Payne” cemetery. On May 4, 1925, the name was officially changed to “New Virginia” cemetery.

Source:
Webster County: Visions of the Past
By Mabel Cooper Skjelver
Published 1980
Page 66


District 65 – New Virginia School

District 65 was called “New Virginia” which in turn gave that name to the Methodist Episcopal church nearby. Henry W. Lambrecht remembered the sod school house as having a flat roof. A sod schoolhouse was in use before the school district built a frame house in 1884. The carpenters were Robert McCallum and J.P. Braynard. Sabbath school was held in the school house before the New Virginia church was built in 1907. In July 1882 the Webster County Argus reported that there was a [farmer’s] alliance held in District 65, called New Virginia. In 1927 a modern two-room school house was built, the old frame having served its time.

Source:
Webster County: Visions of the Past
By Mabel Cooper Skjelver
Published 1980
Pages 78-79


District 65, New Virginia, a one-room school house built in 1884

District 65, New Virginia, a one-room school house built in 1884

District 65, New Virginia school house built in 1927

District 65, New Virginia school house built in 1927

Photographs courtesy of Henry Peterson and Margaret Lambrecht Votipka (Mrs. Ed.)

Source:
Webster County: Visions of the Past
By Mabel Cooper Skjelver
Published 1980
Page 79


This is the location of the New Virginia school house. It is situated in the middle of the section one-half mile East of the New Virginia Church. The original school building burned down in early 2003, but the foundation can still be seen in the satellite imagery.

New Virginia Methodist Episcopal Church

The Virginians and other early residents in the southeast area of Catherton precinct built a church seven and a half miles north of Inavale in the northwest corner of the SW 1/4 of section 26. The present church is the second structure that was built. It is one of the two remaining country churches left in Webster County. The other one is the Dane church, or St. Stephens, in Batin precinct.

The Bladen Enterprise reported on September 15, 1905 that the New Virginia church construction was being “pushed right along.” Svend Lindquist was the carpenter, a Danish farmer-carpenter, then living in Batin precinct. The church dimensions were 28×40 feet. The roof was being put on and the congregation hoped to have it ready for dedication in November. Its cost was $1,652 and was erected under the superintendency and guaranty of Ed Payne and Clarence Wilson. These two men had contributed the two largest sums to the building fund, with John Wilson, Mrs. Marker and E.J. Peterson also large contributors. At that time the New Virginia church was thought to have the largest and most expensive rural church edifice in the county. It had a membership of 30 and an attendance of 75, with a Sunday School of 50.

Unknown problems delayed the dedication for the Bladen Enterprise on August 10, 1906 reported that the dedication of the New Virginia church building which was to have taken place the past Sunday, (August 6) had been postponed until Sunday, August 19, 1906. A fire of unknown origin destroyed the new church Saturday night before it was to be dedicated the following day – Sunday. *

John Marker then lived across the road from the building site and had gone by the church about dusk and had not noticed anything unusual. However, one mule of his team became frightened and difficult to handle. He got the team quieted down and went on home. When he came from the barn, the church as ablaze. While help was called there was no means to put out the blaze, so the structure was entirely destroyed.

On Sunday morning, the congregation gathered at the school house (District 65) and after a short sermon by the District Superintendent, who had come for the anticipated dedication, the congregation discussed their loss. They decided to use the $1,000 insurance monies and to request the balance needed by subscription.

Enough money was obtained by subscription at great sacrifice to the members, so that rebuilding could begin immediately. A new structure was built by Fred Gaverka, and Inavale carpenter, at a cost of $1,650. Masonry work on the chimney was the work of Allen A. “Al” Cooper. The new church was dedicated April 14, 1907. While the church’s name came about because many of the original congregation came from the Shenandoah Valley area of Virginia, many German and Swedish families were charter members. Family names connected with the New Virginia Methodist Episcopal church include: The Wilson Brothers, Clarence, Albert and John; Alford Marker and sons, John and Ford; J.B. Wisecarver; Richard T. Payne and sons, Frances E. “Ed” and Bruce; A.A. Cooper; William Matheny; Henry Williams; Daniel Lovejoy; Eric John Peterson; Henry and Carl Lambrecht; Swan Johnson; with the Jay Lovejoy and Rolly Brooks families becoming members sometime later.

Pastors of the New Virginia Methodist Episcopal church were recalled by Ray Wilson, a longtime church superintendent, who generously served the New Virginia church with his time, energy and money.

Before 1905 New Virginia was part of the Bladen charge, and Rev. T.C. Priestly was the first minister after the second church was built. He was followed by Folden John Bean, E.A. Van Dyke, McVey Hancock, Blackwell Wilson, and Priestly Bromwell.

R.B.E. Hill served from September 24, 1905 to July 18, 1909. The following pastors served the New Virginia Church in later years: H.M. Bassett, Sept. 1910-1911; M.C. Smith 1911-1914; Scott Blunt, 1914-1915; A.E. Murless, 1916-1917; J.W. Borden 1918-1919; Charles E. Schofield 1920-1922; David Simpson 1922-1923; M.E. Henry 1923-1925; Glen W. Marshall, 1925-1928; O.L. Bebb 1928-1929; H.B. Lansing, 1930; C.O. Freeman, 1931-1932; C.C Warriner, September 1933; P.J. Kirk, 1934-1935; O.R. Kleven, 1936 as an evangelist, with C.C. Eston as pastor while Rev. Kleven was holding revivals; Earl L. Russell, September 1937-February 11, 1938; W.A. Mansur, February 11, 1938-September 1939; Ralph Good, 1940-1942; Leslie Moore, 1951. In 1942 ministers were not plentiful, and Inavale became part of the Red Cloud charge. New Virginia then did not have a pastor, but community church services and Sunday school continued with Ray, Norva and Mayme Wilson, Rollie and Veda Brooks, Grace and Margaret Lambrecht and others in the community doing what they could to keep the church active. In 1950 the New Virginia charge was reopened for a short time. The families in the community gathered for a carry-in noon meal, that was followed by a religious service conducted by lay people in the community or by a minister from Red Cloud that was willing to accommodate a rural congregation on occasion.

Lloyd Crabill was the first Sunday School Superintendent of the New Virginia church, and it was he who suggested the name for the new church. The congregation participated in annual Sunday School conventions which included the congregations at Plainview, District 66, Pleasant Prairie and New Virginia – District 65. The New Virginia Ladies Aid was organized in 1907 and is still an active organization.

* Many thought the fire was connected with Rev. R.B.E Hill’s attempt to remove boot-leg liquor from Inavale.

Source:
Webster County: Visions of the Past
By Mabel Cooper Skjelver
Published 1980
Pages 80-82


New Virginia Methodist Episcopal church second structure built 1906-07

New Virginia Methodist Episcopal church second structure built 1906-07

New Virginia Methodist Episcopal Church

New Virginia Methodist Episcopal Church 1955


1907-04-13_New_Virginia_Methodist_Episcopal_Church_Program_Page_1 1907-04-13_New_Virginia_Methodist_Episcopal_Church_Program_Page_2

New Virginia Church

In simplicity the New Virginia church stands upon wide Nebraska prairie land. Nothing special in its outward appearance would prompt a stranger passing by to stop and make a careful study of its structure. Built of wood, it is painted white with three old-fashioned glass windows on each side. From the belfry atop its gray slanted roof a battered lightning rod shows evidence of fighting survival against stormy winds. Its location is about six and on-half miles north of Inavale.

New Virginia Church is named for the people who came to Nebraska from the state of Virginia and filed timber claims in this section of Webster Co. These claims entitled them to an additional 160 acres if they agreed to plant and care for groves of trees upon their land. Courageous, hard working people, they soon realized the value of a church in their community. Included among these Virginia settlers were families of Cooper, Payne, Lark, Wilson, and George Cather, uncle of Willa Cather. They homesteaded here between 1873-1878. The first church was built sometime prior to 1907. This was a community project and each family helped in whatever way they could. Upon completion of the building, some new furnishings, including an organ, were made. These prized possessions were moved into the new church on a Saturday evening as special dedication services were to be held next morning. This honored day had been happily anticipated for a long time. The completion of the building and its readiness for public worship was the realization of a cherished dream.

Unexpected disaster struck during that Saturday night. Family members living in a nearby sod house were wakened by the sound of skyward shooting flames. Too late in rounding up enough help to put out the fire, the people watched helplessly as flames ended their community project. The cause of the fire was never determined. There were various opinions as to its origin, but no positive proof ever made. In the courageous spirit of the early settlers, the church was rebuilt. Upon its completion it was dedicated in 1907. For many years, Sunday School and church services were held each week. A minister from Bladen was in charge.

Now, 68 years later, the tiny church survives. About twenty members attend church services which are held once each month. They have a cooperative dinner at noon time and hold services during the afternoon. A visiting church superintendent made the remark that New Virginia was the only congregation in his district that observed, “Eat before preach.” The Rev. John Baker of Blue Hill is the present minister. It is an ordinary appearing building, yet its distinctions are unique. In the June 16, 1961 edition of Life Magazine its picture appeared in a feature article, “Weddings Around the World”. An Inavale girl, Sherita Lambrecht, was married here and her rural wedding made part of the story. Willa Cather refers to this church in her book “O’ Pioneers.” It is also included in Red Cloud’s Cather Land Tour. Perhaps its greatest distinction is the fact that the people of this community have cared enough to keep the church door open to serve the spiritual needs of a community.

(From Tribune, June 2, 1975): By Marjorie Blankenbaker

Source:
Webster Atlas by Doover
Compiled 1983


Skjelver Brothers

The two Skjelver brothers, Hans and Otto, filed on homesteads, Hans on May 18, 1873 and Otto in the fall of 1876. Both brothers worked in the lumber camps of Wisconsin before coming to Webster County. Otto came to America in 1869 and Hans came in 1871; however, it was Hans Skjelver who first decided to join a group of Norwegians in Webster County. Both men helped to establish the Norwegian Zion Lutheran church and a religious school that was eventually to be District 66, “North Star,” a name selected because of the many Scandinavians within the community. Otto Skjelver was the first teacher of District 66,  and the Otto post office was named for him. Both brothers were well educated, but Otto, who had a more outgoing personality, became the spokesperson between the Scandinavian and English-American community. He helped interpret American laws, customs and their usage to his fellow countrymen. It is ironic that some of these laws worked against his best interest and deprived him of land that he thought was rightfully his.

Source:
Webster County: Visions of the Past
By Mabel Cooper Skjelver
Published 1980
Pages 63-64

Note:
This citation notes Otto Skjelver filing homestead in the fall of 1876, but Otto filed homestead in December of 1883, as documented here.

Note:
The last sentence is likely referencing the court battle between Peterson & Skjelver that ultimately ended up in the NE Supreme Court in 1895.

Nebraska Hereford Assn. 2012 Commercial Breeder of the Year Award

Rob & Diana Wilson were recently presented with the 2012 Commercial Breeder of the Year Award from the Nebraska Hereford Association. The banquet dinner and awards ceremony was held at Fonner Park  in Grand Island on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Ron Schutte presented the award.

The Wilson Hereford Ranch located in Webster County is owned and operated by Robert Wilson. Rob’s grandfather, Con Wilson, bought the first registered Hereford cattle in 1922, beginning with only four bred heifers and a bull. Rob’s father, Johnny, started operating the ranch after WWII and sold Hereford seed stock for years. Rob came back to the ranch in 1973 and now runs a commercial Hereford cow/calf and yearling operation of around 190 head. His heifers are sold privately all around the country and he markets his steers at local sale barns.

Rob is an active member of the Webster County Fair board and sponsors the Champion British Breeding Heifer each year. He has also been a 4-H leader for more than thirty years and sells club calves to local youths. Rob and his wife, Diana, along with their children and grandchildren continue the family’s longstanding tradition of raising quality Horned Hereford cattle.


F.E. Payne Biographical

F.E. Payne, farmer and stock-raiser, Catherton Township, was born in Frederick County, Va., in September, 1850, and is the oldest child born to R.T. and Sarah (Scribner) Payne. They were the parents of six children, viz.: F.E. (the subject of this sketch), Mrs. Mary Cooper (of this township), Mrs. Ida Brown (of Winchester, Va.), Mrs. Pinkney Hale and Mrs. Carrie Harvey (of Inavale Township), and Robert Bruce (residing with his brother, our subject). The father was a cooper by trade, and lived in his native State till 1884, when he came to Nebraska, locating in this township where he is now living. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The subject of this sketch received a common school education in his native State, and at the age of twenty-two years began life for himself as a farmer, following that occupation with success in his native State until 1877, when he came to this State. Here he entered a homestead and timber claim, comprising 320 acres in Section 34-3-12 on Farmers’ Creek, all of which he has under an excellent state of cultivation, well improved with good buildings, fruit and forest trees, etc. He is active in politics and votes with the Prohibition party, and for a time has held the office of justice of the peace in this township. He was married in July, 1881, to Mrs. Vernie (Cather) Clutter, widow of Webster Clutter, and daughter of William and Caroline (Smith) Cather, of Virginia; she died in December, 1885, leaving him one child, Wilella. Mr. Payne is a member of the Baptist Church.

Source:
Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Adams, Clay, Webster, and Nuckolls Counties, Nebraska
Published 1890
Page 646

Veterinary Medicine on the Farm

Nebraska Farm Life WWI to WWII is a book written by Richard C. McCall based on a true story of a family growing up on a Nebraska farm. In Chapter 10 “Veterinary Medicine on the Farm” there are several mentions of Con Wilson related to his veterinary work.

“This chapter concerns some of the veterinary problems that we experienced on our farm. We administered most of the veterinary care to our animals ourselves. There was a veterinary in Red Cloud named Doc Hurst, but for some reason or other we never used his services. There was a Dr. Moranville in Guide Rock, who was said to be pretty good, but most of our work was done by a self-taught man named Con Wilson.”

“Cholera was an ever-present problem with hogs…Most of the time, Con Wilson came and administered the vaccine but later during World War II when labor was scarce, we were able to get the vaccine and do it ourselves.”

“There were several instances of cases of lumpy jaw in cattle…A veterinarian would arrive, probably Con Wilson, and treat them with an intravenous injection of calcium into a neck vein.”

“Con Wilson had been called once to clean a cow that had failed to deliver the calf bed. By the time he arrived, this was a very foul smelling, messy job. Dick and Dad were observing and providing some help. Neither of them had the strongest of stomachs and both were wishing they were somewhere else. In the middle of the job, Con withdrew the arm he had had inside the cow, reached into his shirt pocket with that hand, and pulled out a plug of chewing tobacco that he offered to Dad. Dad turned slightly green and left the barn. Dick was amused enough at Dad’s discomfort that he managed to stay to the end.”

Source:
Nebraska Farm Life WWI to WWII
Published 2002
Chapter 10
Pages 79-84 

50 Years Ago – The Virginians

By. Dr. W.A. Thomas

The Wilsons

There is one fact about John Wilson that we must not forget. Before he left Virginia he had married a Miss Wisecarver. To this circumstance, in some measure, the county is indebted for the presence of Johnson B. Wisecarver, usually called “Jack” Wisecarver, and his brother, Wade Hampton, more generally known as “Hamp” Wisecarver. We do not know that Jack was named for the president, Andy Johnson, but Hamp was undoubtedly named after the famous confederate general and senator of South Carolina. The elder of the two brothers, Johnson, came to this county in the fall of 1878. Perhaps the most notable fact in his career in this county was his victimization by the Nebraska Farm Loan & Trust company, whereby he found himself compelled to pay a mortgage on his farm twice. It is bad enough to pay a mortgage debt once in hard times. When it comes to paying twice with accumulated interest of ten years and costs, it becomes a pretty sore burden. Fortunately Mr. Wisecarver held his farm with a close grip until he was able to sell it two years ago for some eight or nine thousand dollars. Even then he sold it too cheap, as events demonstrated. But he was sagacious enough to invest a good part of the money received in other lands, so that he has been benefited by the general increase in the values of farm property. Mr. Wisecarver married Miss Olive Bean, daughter of the Rev. John Bean, who was so highly esteemed during his residence in the northwest portion of the county. There are two children from this marriage, Bertha, who is now Mrs. Bruce Payne, and the bright Rittlo Ethel, whom we permit almost anybody to endeavor to trip in spelling hard words. Since the sale of the farm Mr. Wisecarver has made his home in this city.

“Hamp” Wisecarver came to the county some years later. He married a Miss Holmes, a niece of Mrs. Arthur Wilson. (article missing) During the tabernacle meetings, it is related that one of the evangelists, seeing the abruption with which “Hamp” listened to the exercises, approached him and asked him if he did not think it was time for him to “give his heart to the Lord.” Without any intention of being offensive, “Hamp” replied, after considerable effort and delay, that he needed it for his own use at present. “Hamp” is now running a lunch counter in the city.

Another Wilson that we should have mentioned in connection with her brothers is Elizabeth, who became the wife of John Marker while in Virginia. The Markers followed the Wilsons to this county, where they lived in unassuming, industrious quietude until the election five years ago, when Miss Lizzie surprised a great many of the people by securing an election to the office of county superintendent, and demonstrated that the Virginia settlers possessed a culture that fitted them for any position. John Marker died three or four years ago, his widow and nine children surviving him. Lizzie is well known to our readers by reason of her four years occupancy of our highest educational position; Annie, nicknamed “Tishie,” is an accomplished stenographer in Minneapolis; John, the oldest boy, is managing the homestead; Dora and Carrie are each married and live just out of the county on the Blue; Albert is in California, and Ford and Lena are on the farm with their mother and John.

No account of the Virginians would be complete which omitted mention of the Paynes. The first to come was F.E., or “Ed” Payne. He arrived in 1877. His father, “Uncle Dick” Payne, came the next year, with his young son, Bruce, and his two daughters. “Uncle Dick” passed away many years ago. “Ed” has been something of a political storm center in Catherton township since his arrival. Before coming of G.P. Cather in 1873, the Norwegians, under the lead of one German, O. Lee, made a settlement on Thompson creek in Franklin county. They were located on lands by an old gentleman named Budlong. By him their corners were pointed out. As their Norwegian friends spread out to the east, they eventually met the Virginians spreading from the north and east. By this time the few (article missing) government corners that had been in the township, if any, had been obliterated, and a dispute arose concerning the lines which divided the people of the township, culminating in a new survey under the direction of a town meeting. There being no authority for such a survey, lawsuits arose which kept the two elements of the township, the Virginians and the Norwegians, in disquietude for some years. It fell to Mr. Payne’s lot to be the center of this controversy, his land being near the center of the township. Mr. Payne has also, from the organization of the populist party, been a warm and leading adherent to that party. He is consequently better known to the people of the county than most of the Virginians. While a strenuous fighter, he has never been accused of anything worse than obstinacy by his opponents, which is not the worst fault that could be laid to a man. Mr. Payne has one daughter, Miss Willella. Bruce Payne is a comparatively young man. He is a graduate of the Red Cloud public schools, and was a soldier in the Philippine war. He married Miss Bertha Wisecarver, and is at present in Herman, Nebraska.

The two daughters who came with “Uncle Dick” are now Mrs. Noah Harvey and Mrs. Finley Hale. Another daughter, Mary, is Mrs. Cooper. We have not the pleasure of an acquaintance with the Coopers and cannot relate any particulars concerning them in this issue.

One more Virginian deserves mention who is no longer a resident of the county, Mr. Will Matheney. Mr. Matheney married a Miss Andrews, a niece of Charles Cather. He sold his farm in this county a few months ago for over $9,000, and he is trying to live a life of comparative ease on his farm near Campbell.

We believe that we have enumerated all the Virginians who have ever settled in the neighborhood of Catherton. It must be admitted that there is a goodly number of them. It is not at all surprising that they thought themselves of consequence to build a church and christen it the New Virginia church.

There is one lot of Virginians which ought, perhaps, to be mentioned. The Rinkers also came from the Shenandoah valley, and were neighbors of the Cather and Lockharts. But they settled on Walnut creek. There were two brothers, Josiah and Galloway. Of Josiah, the elder, there were two sons, Clinton and Avilon. Clinton married the daughter of R.B. Fulton. She died within a few years after the marriage. Avilon is back on his father’s farm in Virginia. Galloway Rinker, who remained in this county longer than his brother or nephews, is now in Franklin, but Charles Rinker, his son, is still a resident of Walnut creek.

We have almost forgotten another Virginian who is one of the best known to the people of this city, especially the ladies. The present Mrs. Jones, formerly Mrs. G.W. Francis, came to this county an unmarried girl, and showed that she was capable of making her own way in the world by her work in the harvest field, where she did the work of a man prior to her first marriage. Mrs. Jones is at present in Colorado. Mrs. Bortfeldt is an adopted daughter, whom she reared to womanhood with a mother’s affection and care.

A.N. Wilson drowns while swimming in a flooded draw

One of the most tragic accidents that has occurred in this county for many years took place in Catherton precinct, 16 miles northwest of Red Cloud Sunday afternoon, shortly after four o’clock. Albert N. Wilson and a young man by the name of Ole Iverson went bathing in a pond that had been constructed by the damming of a draw. The water was 15 feet deep and about 40 across. They had not been in the water long before Mr. Wilson was heard to give a cry for help and at the same time was seen to throw his arms widely into the air and then sink from view. Young Iverson, at once surmising that the swimmer had been stricken with cramps, immediately went to the rescue, but the struggling man proved too heavy for the younger one and he was forced to abandon him, after he himself was nearly drowned in his efforts to lend assistance. Other help was then secured, and a rope was tied around young Iverson and he made for the place where the body had disappeared. He made a heroic effort to dive and reach the man whose life was, or had already  passed away, but without avail. When he came to the surface blood was running from his nostrils and but for the rope about him he would have never reached the shore. Work was then begun to break the dam and drain the pond, but this consumed time and it was an hour before a sufficient amount of water had escaped to permit of recovering the body. Of course life was then entirely extinct but doctors had been summoned both from Bladen and Red Cloud and they worked with the man in a vain attempt to start a spark of respiration. It was a sad ending of a prosperous life. The funeral was held from the home Monday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Priestly of Bladen. It was the largest funeral ever witnessed in the history of Webster County, the first of the procession reaching the cemetery one mile distant before the last had left the residence.

Albert N. Wilson was born in Frederick county, Virginia November 9, 1856. In 1877 he came to Webster county and settled in the southern part of Catherton precinct but a few years later purchased a farm 6 1/2 miles from Bladen. On October 29, 1855, he was married to Mary Robinson, who now survived him, and with three children, Vera, Maud and Kenneth, mourns the untimely departure of a true husband and kind father. He also leaves an aged father, two sister and three brothers.

Source:
The Webster County Argus
1902 

Clarence H. Wilson Obituary

Clarence Wilson aged about 75 years dropped dead suddenly in the Inavale Pool Hall last evening, death attributed to a heart attack.

Clarence H. Wilson was born in Frederick County, Virginia, February 14, 1855, and died at Inavale, July 15, 1930 age 75 years.

He came to Nebraska as a young man in September, 1877, and purchased the farm six miles north Inavale where he spent the remainder of his life, living continuously on this place for more than half a century. When he came here, there was no railway town nearer than Hastings, and the country was yet undeveloped.

Mr. Wilson was eminently fitted by temperament and physical hardihood for pioneer life, and it was men like him who made the wilderness into a garden. In the hardships and privations incident to the life of a pioneer he developed a keen sympathy of mutual understanding of his neighbors and friends.

He was united in marriage to Amanda E. Brooks, February 6, 1887, and three children came to bless their home, Raymond, Gladys and Chester.

He took his bride to the home he had prepared and for more than thirty years they shared the joys and sorrows of pioneer life and rearing their children. Mrs. Wilson’s death on May 2, 1917 was the first shadow that fell on their happy home and was a blow from which he never recovered.

Mr. Wilson was not only a pioneer in this community but was in many respects the founder of this neighborhood. It was largely through his efforts and those of his good wife that the New Virginia Church was organized and later the building erected.

His passing marks the end of the original settlers in the New Virginia neighborhood, he being the last of that group who came from Virginia in the seventies.

Funeral services were held in the home and at the New Virginia Church.

Death of R.T. Payne

The many friends of Uncle Dick Payne were surprised to learn of his death during Sunday night. The previous day he had visied his son and though he seemed in usual health, complained of not feeling very well. This was the last seen of him alive. During Monday his son called at the house and found him lying dead in his bed. The open Bible and his spectacles were upon the table as he had left them upon retiring for the night, when he laid down to his last long sleep. Death had come without warning during his slumber, and he passed away gently and peacefully.

Richard Thornton Payne was born in Loudoun County, Va., March 28, 1828, was married Dec. 10, 1849 to Sarah A. Scrivner who preceded him to the heavenly land in 1891, and with whom he had lived for forty years. Mr. Payne was a great reader of the old family Bible and a member of the church since 1855. He leaves six children, one daughter who lives in Virginia, Mrs. Finley Hale, in Missouri; one son, Bruce, is a soldier in the Philippine Islands serving in the First Nebraska, and one son, F.E.

Payne, and two daughters, Mrs. A.A. Cooper and Mrs. Noah Harvey, at his late Nebraska home, and a host of friends to mourn his demise.

The funeral service was conducted by Rev. A.G. Blackwell at the New Virginia school house and the remains were followed to the cemetery by a large concourse of relatives and friends.

F.E. Payne Obituary

F.E. Payne was born in Frederick county, Virginia, September 23, 1850 and was aged 66 years, 8 months and 16 days.

He received a common school education in his native state, and at the age of twenty-two years he began life for himself as a farmer, following that occupation with success in Virginia until 1877, when he came to Nebraska, homesteading on 320 acres in Catherton township, where he continued to reside until the time of his death.

He took an active part in local and state politics, and in 1914 was chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee.

Mr. Payne was always ready and willing to take an interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the state, county and community, and during the past winter he devoted much time to the Federal Road Act.

He was a man possessing all the qualities of a gentleman, kind and loving father, and husband, a good neighbor and an upright christian man, having been a member of the Baptist church for many years.

In July, 1881 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Vernie clutter, to this union was born one daughter, Wilella, now Mrs. C.M. Wilson. Mrs. Payne preceeded him to the great beyond in the year of 1885.

He is survived by one daughter, four grand children, one brother and three sisters.

Funeral services were conducted at the New Virginia church Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock by Rev. R.B.E. Hill of McCool, and was largely attended by neighbors and friends of deceased, and the remains were laid to rest in the new Virginia cemetery.

F.E. Payne Will Be Buried Sunday

As announced in these columns on Wednesday evening, F.E. Payne had just been found dead in his field, where he had been plowing and the following obituary is taken from yesterday’s issue of the Red Cloud Chief:

“The deceased was born in Frederick county, Virginia, September 23, 1850 and was aged 66 years, 8 months and 16 days.”

“He received a common school education in his native state, and at the age of twenty-two years he began life for himself as a farmer, following that occupation with success in Virginia until 1877, when he came to Nebraska, homesteading on 320 acres in Catherton township, where he continued to reside until the time of his death.”

“He took an active part in local and state politics, and in 1914 was chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee.”

“Mr. Payne was always ready and willing to take an interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the state, county and community, and during the past winter he devoted much time to the Federal Road Act.”

“He was a man possessing all the qualities of a gentleman, kind and loving father, and husband, a good neighbor and an upright christian man, having been a member of the Baptist church for many years.”

“In July, 1881 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Vernie Clutter, to this union was born one daughter, Wilella, now Mrs. C.M. Wilson. Mrs. Payne preceeded him to the great beyond in the year of 1885.”

“He is survived by one daughter, four grand children, one brother and three sisters.”

Funeral services will be held in the New Virginia church in Catherton precinict on Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock in charge of Revs. Hummel and Hill.

F.E. Payne Dies Suddenly

On Wednesday afternoon, while plowing on his farm, Mr. F.E. Payne, one of the most highly respected citizens of Catherton township, dropped dead.

The deceased was born in Frederick county, Virginia, September 23, 1850 and was aged 66 years 8 months and 16 days.

He received a common school education in his native state, and at the age of twenty-two years he began life for himself as a farmer, following that occupation with success in Virginia until 1877, when he came to Nebraska, homesteading on 320 acres in Catherton township, where he continued to reside until the time of his death.

He took an active part in local and state politics, and in 1914 was chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee.

Mr. Payne was always ready and willing to take an interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the state, county and community, and during the past winter he devoted much time to the Federal Road Act.

He was a man possessing all the qualities of a gentleman, kind and loving father, and husband, a good neighbor and an upright christian man, having been a member of the Baptist church for many years.

In July, 1881 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Vernie clutter, to this union was born one daughter, Wilella, now Mrs. C.M. Wilson. Mrs. Payne preceeded him to the great beyond in the year of 1885.

He is survived by one daughter, four grand children, one brother and three sisters.

At the time of going to press arrangements had not been made for the funeral services.

F.E. Payne Death Announcement & Obituary

Ed Payne, prominent and well known Webster county farmer, died suddenly of heart failure while at work in the field on his farm in Catherton Township Wednesday afternoon about four o’clock. Mr. Payne was at work driving a riding plow and apparently was in his usual good health. Employees on the farm noticed the team standing at one corner of the field with Mr. Payne in the seat but in a leaning position. Upon investigation it was found that life was extinct and that he had fallen forward and the body had caught in the machinery and to all appearances he had died instantly.

Source:
Bladen Enterprise

Friday, May 11, 1917
Page 1, Column 4 


F.E. Payne was born in Frederick County, Virginia, September 23, 1850 and was aged 66 years, 8 months and 16 days. He received a common school education in his native state, and at the age of twenty-two years he began life for himself as a farmer, following that occupation with success in Virginia until 1877, when he came to Nebraska, homesteading on 320 acres in Catherton township, where he continued to reside until the time of his death. He took an active part in local and state politics, and in 1914 was chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee. Mr. Payne was always ready and willing to take an interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the state, county and community, and during the past winter he devoted much time to the Federal Road Act. He was a man possessing all the qualities of a gentleman, kind and loving father, and husband, a good neighbor and an upright christian man, having been a member of the Baptist church for many years. In July, 1881 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Vernie Clutter, to this union was born one daughter, Wilella, now Mrs. C M Wilson. Mrs. Payne preceded him to the great beyond in the year of 1885(sic). He is survived by one daughter, four grandchildren, one brother and three sisters. Funeral services were conducted at the New Virginia church Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock by Rev R B E Hill of McCool, and was largely attended by neighbors and friends of deceased, and the remains were laid to rest in the new Virginia cemetery.

Source:
Bladen Enterprise

Friday, May 18, 1917
Page 1, Column 4 

Services Tuesday for Mrs. Con Wilson

Mr. and Mrs. Clair Duval, Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Kile and Mr. and Mr.s Laurence Grandstaff attended funeral services Tuesday for Mrs. Con Wilson who passed away Sunday at the Webster County Community hospital in Red Cloud, after a long illness. She was 77 hears of age and a lifetime resident of Webster County. She made her home for many years in the New Virginia community southwest of Bladen. Among the relatives surviving is a daughter, Mrs. Milton Lutz of Bladen. The Rev. J.W. Scott of Red Cloud and the Rev. L.O. Seger of Bladen officiated at the services at the New Virginia cemetery.

1993 Nebraska Hereford Tour

Stop 5 – Wilson Hereford Ranch
Monday, Sept. 20, 1993  Time: 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Stop Location: Bladen

Welcome to the Wilson Hereford Ranch located in Webster County, in south central Nebraska.

The farm/ranch has been in the family for 117 years. Rob’s great-grandfather, John Payne, homesteaded this land in 1876. Robs’ grandfather, Con Wilson, started this home headquarters in 1916. In 1922 he bought the first registered Hereford cattle. They came from around Cambridge, Nebr. from Mousel’s. He started with four bred heifers and a bull. Later he bought some more from Manger’s north of Bladen and from a ranch in Kansas. Con was a veterinary for many years. He still had a practice when he was 92 years old.

Johnny Wilson started operating the ranch after WWII and sold Hereford seed stock for years. He is still very active in the day to day work.

Robert Wilson came back to the ranch in 1973 after working at the meat animal research center for two years.

We now run a commercial Hereford cow/calf and yearling operation. Currently, we are using AI bulls from Mile City, ABS, and Canada. Herd bulls are purchased from Upstream, Spencer Herefords, Grabenstein Herefords, Ron Albrecht, Bob Long Herefords of Kansas and Schepp Herefords of Wray, Colo.

The fifth generation great-great-granddaughters, Laci and Amber Wilson, are exhibitors at the county fair showing Hereford steers and heifers.

We thank you for stopping and invite you to visit any time.

Robert and Johnny Wilson and family